I am the shadow of a forgotten memory glistening on my windowpane,

All wet with morning rain.

The man I see, only fleetingly; is never me!

Yet his visage follows my every waking step.

 

 

A dash of wine; spattered on my ragged beard, like so much unneeded blood;

I wonder if it is mine.

The ache of forgetfulness seeps into my soul, and I am grateful,

For the reprieve.

 

-Ezra Hilyer

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Imagination VS. Knowledge -Albert Einstein [Quote]

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‘IMAGINATION IS MORE IMPORTANT THAN KNOWLEDGE’ – ALBERT EINSTEIN (1879-1955)

At first, this quote sounds a little quaint and assuming; as though a vivid imagination is all that is necessary to succeed. Were this true, it would be welcome relief for all the worried parents of starry eyed oblivious school children. Imagination is valueless without some knowledge; this is self-evident: How can any fancy begin without a place to start, and experienced life to base an idea upon.

Those who have wild imaginations more often than not are also those who ‘know’ many things. Knowledge in it’s base form is simply what you can regurgitate from a book, however couple that with some imagination, and one can cease to walk only the path that has been pre-prescribed for him, and can instead wander at will in the fields of the mind. I would counter that imagination with little knowledge is more valuable than much book learning with no creativity. To couple a wide array of interests with no limitation to where your mind can take you is the true goal.

It was said that there were only two people in the world who could understand ‘General Relativity’ – Einstein….and God.

The Damps Of Autumn – W.S. Landor [Quote]

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The damps of autumn sink into the leaves and prepare them for the necessity of their fall; and thus insensibly are we, as years close around us, detached from our tenacity of life by the gentle pressure of recorded sorrow. W.S. Landor (1775 – 1864)

I read that quote, once, twice; ten times. I wonder what unspoken grief pressed his hand to the parchment to pen those lines? How often he must have felt the ‘damps of autumn’ seeping into his soul, and felt a heaviness of step, and weary bones?

Face-to-face with his own mortality; the author bleeds ink to his page. Now nearly 150 years after his death, I read those lines, and think I know what was going on in his soul: Are we ‘detached from our tenacity of life’ merely by age, or as Landor wrote: ‘by the gentle pressure of recorded sorrow’ ?

I sense a deep rift between life, and the prospect of death, as though he is weighing the cost, and the benefits of continuing despite the toil and pain. When we are young, we have that sharp ‘tenacity’ to hold on. The very concept of youth is wrapped up in a veracity to live, and a feeling of immortality.

The older we are; the less death seems a specter to be fought, and more it seems an old friend to be embraced.